Multiple Table of Contents

There are three methods of creating multiple Tables of Contents for a long document.

The first method is the simplest, and is useful for very long documents such as booklets where it is helpful to have a short table of contents showing only the heading 1 titles, and then a much more comprehensive table of contents detailing all heading style titles in the booklet.

The second and third methods are used when you want to create separate tables of content throughout a document, for example you may want to have a short table of contents at the beginning of the document and then a detailed table of contents for each separate section throughout.

Method 1

You may want to create a multiple Table of Contents, for example for a University booklet. At the beginning of the booklet you may want two TOCs: a short, abbreviated TOC with just the main section headings of the booklet, and following it a full comprehensive TOC detailing the headings within each section.

The first Table of Contents would show the section headings: Mathematics, Sciences, Languages, and so on, and the second Table of Contents would show each section heading and all the individual departments within them.

If you have used Word's built-in heading styles when creating the document, the two TOCs can be simply created as follows:

  1. Create two automatic TOCs at the start of your document (see fact sheets Create a Table of Contents). Make sure you leave at least two lines between them.
  2. Press Alt +F9 to reveal the TOC code, which should look similar to this: {TOC \o "1-3" \h}
  3. In the first TOC, change the \o switch from "1-3" to "1-1" to shorten it to just the Heading 1 styles. For example: {TOC \o "1-1" \h} - this will create the short, abbreviated TOC.
  4. The second TOC includes all the heading styles defined by the automatic Table of Contents, eg Heading 1, Heading 2, and Heading 3 entries by default, therefore it becomes the larger, comprehensive TOC.
  5. Press F9 to update the changes to the first Table of Contents – choose Update Entire Table from the resulting dialogue box.
  6. Press Alt+F9 to reveal both Tables of Contents.

Note: Within the TOC code you can see "switches", i.e., \o "1-3" is the switch that defines that heading styles 1-3 will be used to create the Table of Contents, if you want to show more or less heading styles you can alter the second number. The \h switch turns the Table of Contents entries into hyperlinks. You can add switches to add more functionality to a TOC, eg add the \n switch to remove the page numbers from the TOC, if you want to remove the page numbers for all heading styles except heading 1, add the switch \n "2-3" (assuming 3 levels). Switches are not case sensitive. Remember to press F9 to update the changes after you have added a switch.

Method 2

You can use Table Identifiers to create separate tables of contents. The default Table Identifier is C, which is used when you create an automatic Table of Contents.

You can create custom Tables of Contents using other letters to identify them; they can be assigned any letter of the alphabet except C, which is already assigned, therefore you can create up to 26 custom tables of contents using this method. They must be created manually.

To create a custom Table of Contents with a Table Identifier:

  1. Mark the text that you want to see in the TOC as follows:
    1. Select the text (e.g. a University booklet where a chapter is Management, you would select the heading text Marketing Management if that were you first subheading in that section).
    2. Press Alt+Shift+O to open the Mark Table of Contents Entry dialogue box.
    3. At Table Identifier choose the letter you want to use as the identifier for the section (any except C, or a letter that has been assigned to another custom TOC)
    4. At level, the default is level 1 which you should leave at this stage. You can create up to 9 TOC heading levels for each TOC you create.
    5. Keep the Mark Table of Contents Entry dialogue box open.

      Note: when you open the Mark Table of Contents Entry dialogue box, the non-printing characters will automatically appear on screen, don’t worry about this, and do not change the pagination of the document, some of the longer non-printing characters give a false impression of page breaks. After completing the new TOC, press the Show/Hide button on the Standard Toolbar (Word 97, 2000, 2002, 2003) or in the Paragraph group on the Home Ribbon (Word 2007). The non printing characters will no longer be visible and the pagination will return to normal.
  2. Select the next heading that you want to include in your TOC, e.g. if using the example given in 1a above, you would select another management heading, e.g. Retail Management. Click in the Mark Table of Contents Entry dialogue box, which will pick up the heading you just selected.
  3. Continue in this way until you have selected all of the headings that you want to be included in your Table of Contents. Close the Mark Table of Entry dialogue box
  4. Place the cursor where you want your Table of Contents to appear.
  5. Press Ctrl+F9 to create empty field braces {} (do not type the curly brackets manually – that does not create an empty field!).
  6. Inside the brackets type {TOC \f D}. (Assuming the letter D is used to identify the TOC. The \f switch collects up all the titles you have assigned to the letter.)
  7. Press F9 to update the Table of Contents. If the Field code, rather than the Table of Contents itself is still visible, press Alt+F9 to reveal the Table of Contents. (Alt+F9 is a toggle.)

Method 3

Provided that you have used Word’s built-in heading styles or outline levels, you can use bookmarks to create a Table of Contents at any point in a document. For example, for each chapter in a booklet, as used in Method 2 above, however with this method, because built-in heading styles are used, you do not need to mark each heading individually.

To create a Table of Contents using bookmarks:

  1. Select all of the text for the entire chapter from the first heading to be used in the TOC.
    1. For Word 97, 2000, 2002 and 2003 click on the Insert menu and select Bookmark
    2. For Word 2007, click the Insert ribbon tab and choose Bookmark in the Links group.
  2. Type a name for the bookmark (eg "Management") and click Add.
  3. Place the cursor where you want the Table of Contents to be.
  4. Press Ctrl+F9 to create empty field braces {} (do not type the curly brackets manually – that does not create an empty field!)
  5. Inside the field braces type the \b switch along with the bookmark name. For example,
    {TOC \b "Management"} The TOC field then collects all the text marked with heading styles or outline levels from the entire bookmarked area named "Management."
  6. Press F9 to update the Table of Contents. If the Field code, rather than the Table of Contents itself is still visible, press Alt+F9 to reveal the Table of Contents. (Alt+F9 is a toggle.)

In addition to being used for TOCs, bookmarks are used to identify a location or selection of text that you name for future reference simply as a go to, or for more advanced documents they are used in code.

Note: You must use either built in heading styles or outline levels when creating the document if you want to use bookmarks to create multiple Tables of Contents.

 

Applies to all versions of Microsoft Word.